Role of Asa Candler

In 1887, another Atlanta pharmacist and businessman, Asa Candler bought the formula for Coca-Cola from inventor John Pemberton for $2,300. By the late 1890s, Coca-Cola was one of America’s most popular fountain drinks, largely due to Candler’s aggressive marketing of the product and whole-hearted acceptance of the product by a huge population.

With Asa Candler, now at the tiller, the Coca-Cola Company increased sales by over 4000% between 1890 and 1900. Moreover, advertising was an important factor in John Pemberton and Asa Candler’s success and by the turn of the century, the drink was sold across the United States and Canada.

This was because they worked on advertising and specifically on word-of-mouth marketing. As people would go and tell others about the product. Around the same time, the company began to earn from a second source i.e. by selling the beverage to independent bottling companies licensed to sell the drink. Even today, the US soft drink industry is organized on this principle. (Christopher P.)

Death of the Soda Fountain – Rise of the Bottling Industry

Until the 1960s, both small town and big city inhabitants and residents enjoyed carbonated beverages at the local soda fountain or ice cream saloon which were often housed in the drug store, the soda fountain counter served as a meeting place for people of all ages. But due to the increase in popularity of bottled soft drinks and fast-food restaurants, the soda fountain declined in popularity as people now can enjoy their carbonated beverage anywhere they want to as it was available in bottles.

New Coke

On April 23, 1985, the trade secret “New Coke” formula was released. The New Coke was introduced with modifications not only in the formula but also in the bottles’ appearance. Today, products of the Coca-Cola Company are consumed at the rate of more than one billion drinks per day all over the world. (Franklin M.)

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